Making work look like play


People like to think cats lead lives of total luxury, but that’s not strictly true. We spend a lot of time protecting our homes from strangers — we’re the first to sound the alarm, whether it’s that pesky chipmunk taking all the birdseed from the feeder again or a neighbor kid at the door wanting to sell popcorn.

And do we have to get into the need for vigilance when it comes to bugs? We can see things people can’t see, as evidenced by the number of times we’ll both be staring up at the wall, only to have some person keep asking, “What do they see? I don’t see anything!”

It’s maddening. It is right there — why don’t you come do something about it?

But these are noble pursuits, bred in the bone. All cats are hunters and warriors, whether their domain is the vast savannah or a cosy condo.

Mischief flattens a cardboard box so it will fit in the recycling bin.

Because we like our person, Decca, so much, we also try to help her around the house whenever we can. We realize that may shock some of our readers. Cats were worshipped in the ancient world, after all, and as Siamese, we mustn’t forget we’re descended from royalty. With royal privilege comes royal obligation, though, and it wouldn’t do to lose touch with the common world. We know our history. Look what happened to the Bourbons and the Romanovs.

Trouble cleans the bathtub.

To accomplish both goals, we’ve discovered a nifty trick that you, dear feline reader, could try at home. You get a good workout — and sometimes even treats — while preserving your dignity as well. Make the work look like play!

Trouble arranges flowers for the dinner table.

For example, when Decca gets that big, noisy vacuum cleaner out (which is far too seldom, we have to say), our job is to protect her from that snake-like cord. It’s apt to catch on chairs and wind itself around her ankles like an anaconda. So, by pretending we are chasing it, we keep the cord as much out of her way as we can. We also point out areas on the carpet needing extra attention by running in front of the machine.

As you can see from the accompanying photos, we’ve found many other ways to help with the housework. This past week was particularly busy, since we had house guests. That involves so much preparation — from hunting down and capturing fluffy clumps of hair under the furniture (Trouble says he’s a shorthair, but he’s suspiciously fluffy) to making the rooms attractive and planning menus (Mischief takes keen interest in the culinary arts).

Mischief consults on the dinner menu.

So what about you, dear readers? Are there aspects of domestic science that you especially enjoy? Tell us about it, and if you send our Decca a photo (at deccaprice@gmail.com), we’ll post it next week and give you a shoutout on Twitter.

(If you’d have a website and would like to be considered for a link here at DeccaCats, email her about that, too.)

Housework can be exhausting.

We love this book!


Award-winning children’s book author and illustrator Hudson Talbott knows his audience. He knows cats.

“It’s All About Me-Ow – A Young Cat’s Guide to the Good Life” ” by Hudson Talbott (Nancy Paulsen Books 2012; ISBN 978-0-399-25403-1; $16.99 USA/$18.00 Canada. Hardcover)

With a title like “It’s All About Me-Ow,” how could we resist his new book? Clearly, this book is a serious scholarly tome aimed at bridging the feline-human communications divide. With lots of fun pictures! All are very colorful and full of detail.

We think he must have been a cat in another life. His narrator, Buddy, welcomes three kittens into his home and teaches them how to wrap their new human family around their little paws. They learn about why cats are superior to people, the value of “purr therapy” to a busy family, how to get the most fun out of the furniture, how to train a human and lots more.

Our favorite parts, though, were the history of the cat and the cat family tree (and not just because he put a Siamese cat in that picture!) We could spend hours looking at those pages.

Mischief has a question about cats in ancient Egypt.

The best thing about this book, though, is that it gave us lots to talk about. Where did the kittens come from? What are their names? Is this their forever home or are these really, really nice people who foster homeless kitties? What is Buddy’s story and why is he so welcoming to these adorable competitors for food and laps? What happens next??

Trouble wants to know more.

We will be waiting eagerly for Mr. Talbott to write a sequel that answers these questions. If Hollywood calls, there’s opportunity for a prequel as well.

In the meantime, though, it’s fun to let our imaginations run wild! That’s the best kind of book.

The only thing we don’t like about this book? It gives away too many feline secrets. Cats, we need to keep our people guessing! We’ll be keeping an eye out for you, Hudson Talbott.

We give this book our highest rating: 5 Paws!

Writing is hard work


Mischief offers suggestions while Trouble develops his keyboard skills.

Well, here we are. This writing business is harder than it looks, especially when you’ve got a partner. One of us wants to write about what goes on outside (Mischief, the dark handsome sealpoint) and one of us wants to write about goes on inside (Trouble, the chocolate point, aka the mocha marvel) and we both want to write about Life and stuff.

Our person, Decca, says we can write about anything we want as long as we use good grammar and spelling and don’t use baby talk. Decca is a writer and she cares about things like that.

Decca makes writing look like fun, the way her fingers make the keys clack. We like that sound. It’s almost as good as tissue paper rustling! That’s why we try to help her whenever we can.

We call Decca our person because that’s what she is. She not our mom. That would be Sophie. She is a sealpoint like Mischief, only smaller. She was a good mom and we miss her, but she taught us a lot of good things before we came to live with Decca when we were 12 weeks old. We’re 2 now. We tweet “Things our mother taught us” every Friday @DeccaCats.

Last week it was “Poke your nose into everything.” We work hard at that. Decca wasn’t half upset when she saw we could open the sideboard cabinet in the dining room. It just has old dishes in it, but you never know when something more interesting could be in there, right? So we check periodically when she’s busy in another room. The clinking usually gives us away, but that’s OK, too.

Decca doesn’t yell at us, she does what she calls “distracting” when she wants us to stop doing what we’re doing. We call that getting her to play with us! So we try to do “distracting” things a lot so she’ll leave the keyboard and play.

Except now we want our turn to write, too!

Bye now and thanks for reading. Follow us on Twitter and we’ll tell you when Decca lets us write again.

Welcome to our world!


Trouble and Mischief

What can be better than felinity? We rule the web; a world-famous art museum recently drew thousands — We suspect millions — to the first-even international cat video festival. (We were resting and did not attend. Here is the winning video.); We dare you to go to YouTube and search for “cat.” There aren’t enough hours in a day!

We realize We are not the first to venture onto the Web, nor will We be the last. But to amuse our favorite in-house author, chronologer and factotum, We graciously agreed to lend our images for this endeavor. We invite you to view our photo gallery. All rights reserved!

Trouble and Mischief *
* (Pseudonyms, of course. If She can do it, so can We.)